Health services research is the multidisciplinary field of scientific investigation that studies how social factors, financing systems, organizational structures and processes, health technologies, and personal behaviors affect access to health care, the quality and cost of health care, and ultimately our health and well-being. ~ AcademyHealth, 2000

IU Center for Health Services and Outcomes Research

The Indiana University Center for Health Services and Outcomes Research (IU CHSOR), Indiana University Center for Aging Research (IU CAR), and Regenstrief Center for Biomedical Informatics (CBMI) are the three primary research centers within the Institute collaboratively working to advance the science of continually improving healthcare delivery systems.

  • IU CHSOR improves the delivery and outcomes of heath care through innovative research on health information, technology, and communication.
  • IU CAR transforms health care for vulnerable elders. The center develops, tests, and implements innovative strategies to improve the quality and efficiency of healthcare and self-care for medically and socially vulnerable older adults.
  • CBMI develops and evaluates innovative informatics solutions to improve patient care and translate these solutions into cost-effective, operational systems, including a dynamic electronic medical record system.

Scholarly opportunities for medical students within the Health Services and Outcomes Research group are varied, including: clinical trials, health communication, health information technology, and process improvement/systems intervention. All of the faculty are experienced mentors who value the addition of medical students to their working groups.

Why is health services research important?

Health services research (HSR) experts study how social factors, health delivery systems and processes, health technologies, and personal behaviors affect access to health care, the quality and cost of care, and the health and well-being of patients. HSR investigators contribute to the science of translation and practical application by helping original research findings make a successful journey from scientific evidence to sustainable, wide scale implementation.

Structure of Internship:

Interns will be assigned faculty mentors based on the intern’s interest and faculty/health systems leader availability. Interns will be required to attend the weekly IMPRS Summer Research Student Seminar Series and relevant Regenstrief work-in-progress (WIP) meetings.

Faculty Mentors Research Description
Dawn M. Bravata, MD (IU CHSOR) Project examining the health and well-being benefits of participatory arts therapy (which includes music therapy and creative arts therapy) for patients and caregivers (location Roudebush VA HSR&D Center for Health Information and Communication)
Jennifer Carnahan, MD, MPH, MA (IU CAR) OPTIMISTIC research program
Clint Cary, MD, MPH (IU CHSOR) Data collection for a testicular cancer project to assess recurrence and survival outcomes following surgery for early stage testis cancer
Brian E. Dixon, MPA, PhD, FHIMSS (CBMI) Dr. Dixon’s work is focused in the domain of Public Health Informatics. Project opportunities include 1) chart reviews to validate ICD coding in medical records and examination of factors associated with inaccurate records, 2) identification of true vs. false positive diagnoses in the reporting of notifiable conditions, or 3) identification of non-clinical data sources for social determinants of health with potential for use in clinical decisions as well as research.
Nicole R. Fowler, PhD, MHSA (IU CAR) Research focused on identifying and addressing the impact of dementia in patient and caregiver populations
Shaun Grannis, MD, MS, FAAFP(CBMI) Dr. Grannis works to advance technical infrastructure and data-sharing capabilities through improved health information system identity management and implementation and evaluation of automated patient record matching strategies. Interns will review the output of record linkage algorithms to evaluate the accuracy of those algorithms and have the opportunity to validate other machine learning algorithms.
David A. Haggstrom, MD, MAS(IU CHSOR) Cancer population analytics and patient-centered informatics; project to enhance and evaluated an electronic personal health record to meet the needs of cancer survivors
Babar Khan, MD, MS (IU CAR) Data management or subject recruitment in the ICU for the Mobile Critical Care Recovery Program (mCCRP) and in a program to Decrease Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias after Delirium through Exercise and Cognitive Training(DDD-ECT)
Debra K. Litzelman, MA, MD, MACP (IU CHSOR) WeCare Indiana project working to reduce local infant mortality using a community health coaching model; global health services research projects (IU Center for Global Health)
Marianne Matthias, Ph.D. (HSR) Dr. Matthias focuses on communication in chronic pain care and in mental health, with specific research interest in patient-provider communication and clinical decision-making. Project opportunity includes conducting post-intervention qualitative interviews in a study evaluating a peer coach-led intervention to improve pain symptoms (ECLIPSE). (Location Roudebush VA HSR&D Center for Health Information and Communication.)

Application Process:

Applications are due on January 29, 2018. To apply for to Regenstrief’s Institute , fill out the RedCap application form. You will be able to save and return to your application until you are ready to submit for review.

Contact Information:

For additional information about the program, please contact imprs@iupui.edu.

Center for Health Innovation and Implementation Science

Program Overview:

The Center for Health Innovation & Implementation Science (CHIIS) was founded in 2013 through a collaborative effort between the IU School of Medicine and the Indiana Center for Translational Science Institute (CTSI). The mission of the CHIIS is to produce high-quality, patient-centered and cost-effective health care delivery by using the methods and tools of Implementation Science and promoting Innovation.

The Medical Student Internship Program in Implementation Science is designed to help medical students develop the skills needed to translate and implement evidence into practice as clinicians. This program will help students understand the methods and tools of Implementation Science and to apply those tools to a practicum project.

Why is implementation science important?

Approximately 25 clinical trials are published each day in the United States, however, statistics show it takes an average of 17 years before evidence-based practices are adopted into routine health care. To fulfill our mission and vision, the CHIIS employs the tools of Implementation Science to provide services and education that enable health care systems, clinicians, and scientists to create meaningful changes to accelerate moving evidence into clinical practice.

Structure of Internship:

Interns will be assigned faculty mentors based on the intern’s interest and faculty/health systems leader availability. CHIIS will partner students with affiliated scientist or health systems leader at Regenstrief, CTSI, Eskenazi or IU Health for a broad and comprehensive internship experience. Interns will be asked to design an Implementation project using the CHIIS Implementation Science Tool Kit, aligned with the faculty/health system research area. Interns will be required to attend an Implementation Science & Population Health short courses, and to attend a residency weekend session with the CHIIS Graduate Certificate Program for formal training on Implementation Science methods and tools.

Application Process:

Applications are due on January 29, 2018. To apply for the Center for Health Innovation and Implementation Science program, fill out the RedCap application form. You will be able to save and return to your application until you are ready to submit for review.

Contact Information:

For additional information about the program, please contact imprs@iupui.edu.

Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics

Program Overview:

The Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics (CCBB) was founded in 2003 in the IU School of Medicine. The CCBB mission is to promote advanced computation and informatics approaches to increase our understanding of normal and disease-associated biological processes, drug development, and therapeutic responses and to educate the next generation of bioinformaticians through direct participation in research activities. The Medical Student Internship Program in the CCBB is designed to teach medical students the skills needed to conduct computational biology and bioinformatics research in both clinical science and basic science. This program will facilitate the understanding of methods and tools used in high through-put omics data analysis and will apply those tools to a practicum project.

Why is implementation science important?

Computational biology and bioinformatics are closely integrated with almost all phases of biomedical research, such as disease mechanism and drug target discovery in the basic science research, and biomarker discovery in the clinical research. Its role in the precision medicine research is even more prominent. In this era of “big data”, an enormous amount of public domain omics data resources are becoming a driving force for biomedical research.

Structure of Internship:

Interns will be assigned faculty mentors based on the intern’s interest and faculty availability. CCBB will partner students with affiliated scientist at Indiana Institute of Personalized Medicine, Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, Regenstrief, CTSI, Eskenazi or IU Health for a broad and comprehensive internship experience. Interns will be asked to design a computational biology and bioinformatics project using the tools specific to the selected CCBB faculty lab. Interns will be required to attend this faculty lab meeting and CCBB seminar series for formal training and project development.

Faculty Mentor Research Description
Yunlong Liu Bioinformatics approaches to understand regulatory mechanisms of gene expression.
Chi Zhang Single cell genomics and bioinformatics.
Sara Quinney In silico models to better understand factors influencing drug pharmacokinetics and response.
Jun Wan Cancer informatics.

Application Process:

Applications are due on January 29, 2018. To apply for the Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics program, fill out the RedCap application form. You will be able to save and return to your application until you are ready to submit for review.

Contact Information:

For additional information about the program, please contact imprs@iupui.edu.